East Africa: Respiratory Infections and Malaria Remain a Threat in East Africa – Survey
A new scientific analysis of more than 300 diseases and injuries in 195 countries reveals that there has been significant progress in the fight against communicable diseases.

The findings were published in the Lancet. In many East African nations, lower respiratory infection was the leading cause of death, resulting in 58,231 deaths in Ethiopia and 8,181 in Rwanda. On the other hand, HIV/AIDS was the top killer in Kenya, leading to 46,577 deaths in 2015.
But the conditions that kill are not typically those that make people sick. The top three nonfatal causes of poor health in East Africa overall were iron-deficiency anemia, depression, and low back pain. The results further indicate that despite fewer people dying from respiratory infections and malaria in many East African nations, a big number still suffer from serious health challenges related to unsafe sex, childhood wasting, and unsafe water. Dr. Charles Shey Wiysonge,a professor of clinical epidemiology at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, in Cape Town said that significant progress had been achieved but some counties lag behind. “Many nations face significant health challenges despite the benefits of income, education, and low birth rates, while other countries farther behind in terms of development are seeing strong progress,” he said. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) draws work of more than 1,800 collaborators. But the conditions that kill are not typically those that make people sick. The top three nonfatal causes of poor health in East Africa overall were iron-deficiency anemia, depression, and low back pain. The results further indicate that despite fewer people dying from respiratory infections and malaria in many East African nations, a big number still suffer from serious health challenges related to unsafe sex, childhood wasting, and unsafe water. Dr. Charles Shey Wiysonge,a professor of clinical epidemiology at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, in Cape Town said that significant progress had been achieved but some counties lag behind.
“Many nations face significant health challenges despite the benefits of income, education, and low birth rates, while other countries farther behind in terms of development are seeing strong progress,” he said. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) draws work of more than 1,800 collaborators.

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