Doctors should spend more time listening to their patients in order to avoid unnecessary treatments, according to Scotland’s chief medical officer.  Catherine Calderwood wants doctors and patients to have more open and honest conversations about the benefits and risks of procedures or medication.  She argues that quality rather than quantity of life can be more important to patients. And she names her plan “realistic medicine” in her new annual report.Dr Calderwood said she came up with the concept in response to research that found that doctors would make different choices for themselves and their families than they do for their patients.  Doctors should spend more time listening to their patients in order to avoid unnecessary treatments, according to Scotland’s chief medical officer.  Catherine Calderwood wants doctors and patients to have more open and honest conversations about the benefits and risks of procedures or medication.  She argues that quality rather than quantity of life can be more
important to patients. And she names her plan “realistic medicine” in her new annual report. Dr Calderwood said she came up with the concept in response to research that found that doctors would make different choices for themselves and their families than they do for their patients.  There is nothing worse than getting towards the end of your life and you realise you wasted day after day,” he said.  Dr Calderwood wants to see more of these conversations in hospitals and in GP surgeries across the country. After speaking to doctors about how to implement realistic medicine, she now wants to involve the wider health community and to consult people on how they can become more involved in a “person-centred” approach to healthcare.

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