Amblyopia – more commonly known as “lazy eye” – may cause the brain to alter its wiring, according to a new study. As the brain develops its preference for the dominant eye’s input, it alters its connections to the weaker eye, researchers have found. That makes amblyopia – more commonly known as “lazy eye” – all the more obvious, but the physical manifestation of the most common cause of vision problems among children the world over is actually a brain disorder, researchers said. “Most often in amblyopia patients, one eye is better at focusing,” said Bas Rokers, a University of Wisconsin-Madison psychology professor.  “The brain prefers the information from that eye, and pushes down the signal coming from the other, ‘lazy’ eye. In a way, it’s better to think of the better eye as a bully, rather than the poorer eye as lazy,” Rokers said. As the brain develops its preference for the dominant eye’s input, it alters its connections to the weaker eye, according to the study published in the journal Vision Research. “If you continually have that bullying happening, that changes the signals coming from the lazy eye,” Rokers said.

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